** CASTING METAL BOLSTERS & BUTTCAPS**

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What is Babbitt metal?
an antifriction metal first produced by Isaac Babbitt in 1839. In present-day usage the term is applied to a whole class of silver-white bearing metals, or “white metals.” These alloys usually consist of relatively hard crystals embedded in a softer matrix, a structure important for machine bearings. They are composed primarily of tin, copper, and antimony, with traces of other metals added in some cases and lead substituted for tin in others.

What is Pewter?
Throughout it's long history pewter has had an almost infinite variety of compositions, even today there are still numerous varieties produced. The only common factor is a relatively high tin content which is hardened by additions of other elements. In most countries newly manufactured pewter is a lead free alloy usually being hardened with additions of antimony and copper, containing over 90% tin. Other elements such as silver and bismuth are sometimes used in. In the past pewter often contained lead but as awareness has grown into the harmful effects of lead it should now have been eliminated. Modern pewter can be polished to a bright silver like finish or if preferred chemical darkeners can be used to simulate the patinas associated with old pewter.

Pewter, Babbitt, and other casting metals are available from Rotometals, Inc 1-800-779-1102 or www.rotometals.com

Items 6-9 describe the process for casting a bolster without a crossguard.

Item 10 describes the process for casting a bolster with a crossguard.


The above tutorial was originally written to share with my fellow leather craftsman on the Knifenetwork Forums.
The graphics are copyright/courtesy of Macmillan Publishing and are copied from the book
"The Complete How-To Book of Indiancraft" by W. Ben Hunt
This tutorial is copyrighted and all rights are reserved by Wild Rose Trading Company.
Printing a copy or copies for private, non-commercial use is allowed.
Any commercial use is strictly prohibited.
Any non-commercial leather working site wishing to display or link to this tutorial
must get written permission from Wild Rose Trading Company

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